Scary Bathroom Facts You Need To Know

by | Oct 5, 2020 | Bathrooms | 1 comment

“The Bathroom” goes by many different names. The lavatory, the washroom, the toilet, the restroom, the John, the Lou (if you’re English), and many more. Regardless of what you call it, any bathroom you use can hold a few scary secrets and mini monsters that you may or may not be aware of. While ignorance can be bliss, especially when it comes to topics like germs, bacteria, and other pathogens that can cause sickness, the mission of The Restroom Kit is to spread awareness of the perils of the potty room. 

The Restroom Kit knows that with awareness comes preparedness, and preparedness can help you and your family avoid germs, infection, and illness caused by restroom activities like flushing the toilet or even washing your hands.. While the season is getting spooky, you will be hard-pressed to find anything more terrifying than these scary bathroom facts that apply to public restrooms, a family member’s or friend’s bathroom, or even the bathroom in your own home.

There Are Microscopic Monsters on the Toilet Seat

The toilet seat may not be the most germ covered surface in your home. There’s likely more fecal matter on your cutting board from the meats you cut. However, there are still a couple of hundred bacteria per square centimeter on most toilet seats, whether they’re in a home or not. Public restrooms can have 500 to a thousand bacteria per square centimeter. This happens because some people do not close the toilet lid before flushing. Most public restrooms do not even have toilet seat lids, and this can cause bacteria to get everywhere.

Flushing Sends Poop Particles Flying Everywhere

You may have noticed that some public restrooms have a little extra power in the flushing system. While this is beneficial for preventing clogging, it’s also a nightmare of a germ spreader. Whether you’re in a home bathroom or a public bathroom, flushing an open toilet can spread germs all over the surrounding area. This can include the toilet paper roll, the sink, yourself, and even your toothbrush if it’s close enough. The aerosols from flushing can travel about 6 feet. If you’re leaning in to flush the toilet with your hands, many of those bacterial aerosols can get on you, or worse get inhaled by you. You can avoid most of this by closing the toilet lid before flushing. If the toilet doesn’t have a lid, it may be best to try flushing with your foot to keep your eyes, nose, and mouth as far away as possible. 

Your Soap Isn’t As Squeaky Clean As You Think

While most people focus on the contamination of the toilet, the toilet paper, or the door handle, many do not realize that the soap dispenser is also a playground for bacteria. Of course, the outside of the dispenser is often touched to pump the soap out ( unless it’s motion-activated), but the soap inside the dispenser can also be contaminated. Certain public bathroom soap dispensers are refillable. The custodian simply has to unscrew or pop open the lid and pour the soap in. However, this exposure to the aerosols in the bathroom, and the transfer of materials can create contamination in the soap. These dispensers are also likely not getting cleaned regularly, so the ability for the contamination to increase and grow is unregulated. This is also possible in-home bathrooms, as some people may use bar soaps or their own refillable dispensers.

BEWARE: Avoid the Air Dryer

The air dryer, whether motion-activated or not, is one of the most bacteria-spreading items in a public restroom. Warm air dryers and even jet dryers have been proven to have greater amounts of airborne germs around them. The air from the air dryer gets pumped from the air in the bathroom ( which we already know is full of bacterial aerosols) directly to your hands. This is highly dangerous because many unsuspecting people may feel that their hands are clean, and then proceed to touch their eyes, nose, and mouth. 

The Hand Towel Is A Contaminated Surface Too!

You may think that you’re safer in a bathroom in a home than a public restroom in a mall, airport, or park. While the number of bacteria you pick up may be slightly decreased, the dangers still lurk, even on the hand towels. Yes, those pretty, decorative hand towels that are designated for hand drying can hold everything from coliform bacteria, the type most associated with fecal matter, to E. coli and even salmonella. This is partly due to the airborne pathogens, but it is also due to the poor hand washing techniques of people using the towel to dry their hands. 

While the implementation of wearing masks, quarantines, and social distancing were difficult habits to adhere to for many people in the country, the international pandemic did re-introduce proper handwashing techniques to the public and explained the importance of this technique for health and safety.

Trying to Leave the Bathroom is the Most Dangerous Part

Just like in video games, the final boss comes at the end. Even if you use a toilet seat cover, close the lid before flushing, use proper soap/sanitizer and hand washing techniques, and use a paper towel instead of an air dryer, you may still have to touch the door on your way out. Now, you could stand in front of the door patiently until someone opens the door for you, but that is likely not efficient or realistic, especially if you happen to be in a single-person restroom or an airplane lavatory. Using paper towels to open the door would help you, but if your bathroom is only equipped with an air dryer or all out of paper towels, this can put you in a predicament. In many cases, you have to touch the door handle. Most door handles and push plates are contaminated with a plethora of bacteria. Most men’s restroom doors are contaminated with coliform bacteria, which links to fecal matter. However, most women’s restroom doors are contaminated with yeast and not the kind of yeast you would use to make bread. When you’re ready to leave the restroom, one way or another you could be coming into contact with bacteria from any and every point.

There Are No More Bacteria in a Home Bathroom Than a Public Restroom

Many people believe that public restrooms are more contaminated than a typical bathroom in someone’s home. While one bathroom can certainly be cleaner than another at any one point, there’s no evidence to say that public restrooms are more contaminated than a home bathroom, or any other public place that you may go to. The same types of bacteria can exist in either type of bathroom. Most public restrooms have cool, dry environments that don’t support the life of bacteria, including coliform bacteria. Public restrooms are typically cleaned daily because there are often many users throughout a single day. Most home bathrooms are not cleaned daily, but perhaps weekly, or even bi-monthly. So whether you’re at your grandmother’s house, your best friend’s house, or even your religious leader’s house – they still have fecal matter particles in and around their bathroom. So be sure to keep the same hygiene practices as you would in a public bathroom. 

How to Protect Yourself and Your Family From Bathroom Bacteria

Scary bathroom facts like these can make you wonder whether “going” in the woods is better. However, you don’t have to completely forgo 21st-century plumbing to enjoy a truly sanitary and hygienic bathroom experience. The Restroom Kit has all the bathroom essentials you didn’t know you needed so badly. Each kit comes complete with an oversized seat cover to protect your bottom and beyond. It also comes with a complete yard of toilet paper for bowel movements of almost any size. Finally, it comes with two types of wipes: a tush wipe, for an extra clean feeling, and an antibacterial hand wipe to clean your hands and use as a protective barrier for any other surfaces you may have to touch when you’re done.

The Restroom Kit is perfect for taking on any outing or occasion where you may have to use a restroom that isn’t your own. Rather than come into contact with other people’s germs, bacteria, or fecal matter, you can confidently go knowing you’re protected from germs and pathogens. The Restroom Kit is made for one-time use and can be used by men, women, and children of all ages. The easy, on-the-go kit is highly compact and discreet. It is smaller than the average cell phone and can fit inside a small handbag or even a rear pant pocket. When you’re done, you can save the extras you didn’t use, or toss the entire pack in the trash bin. Knowing about these bathroom facts could help keep you and your family healthy and safe this season. Wherever you “go”, be sure you safely “go”. Order The Restroom Kit now by visiting our website at www.therestroomkit.com